Affiliate Marketing Part II: Why Some New Marketers Fail

March 3, 2009

People who are new to affiliate marketing are often excited with the prospect of earning thousands of dollars a month, without the hard work of developing and packaging their own product. After all, there is an easier transition from the pressure of creating your own product to just focusing on marketing a product.

It’s almost the perfect win-win situation. Customers get what they want while you get to give valuable help and earn commissions in the process. Is it really that simple? Not by a long shot.

You will still need to flex that creative marketing muscle to attract visitors to get interested in your affiliate links. What people do no not know is that affiliate marketing is not a ‘one-stop-shop’. There’s no fool proof automatic system that will do all the work for you. Truth be told, there are no hard and fast rules to ensure what works and what doesn’t. Here are sine if the reasons why some marketers fail:

1. No proper training.

Newbies who come to affiliate advertising do not realize that they have their work cut out for them. It’s not as easy as just posting a few ads here and there. It’s not an exact science, and it can cost you and your host valuable business if you make too many mistakes. Not only that, it can even ruin reputations if you deliver sub standard performance for a well known product.

2. Rushing across many mediums and markets.

Newcomers who jump in different programs without a through understanding of their niche markets are setting themselves up for disappointment. Choosing the right niche is important. A good rule of thumb is to choose a product or service that you will be happy to use yourself.

3. Duplicating content of the host business.

Most host businesses cut off affiliates who do not offer their own unique approach to marketing a product. It’s really not cool to copy an established product’s own marketing material. This only makes you compete with your own host in Google rankings, and just spams the list with duplicate content. Visitors are more likely choose between you and your host, or worse, you can get ignored because your affiliate link is as obvious as a banner ad.

4. Spamming

Desperation doesn’t look good on any marketer. If you’re into stealing email lists or spamming through other media, you will just hurt your host’s reputation and even decrease sales big time.

5. Giving poor content with no value.

Part of being a good affiliate is paying close attention to value creation. The most popular sites are often those with real and practical solutions that answer a need or a problem. If you do not have what people are looking for, they would not bother listening to your pitch.

Which affiliate expert is the best one for you?

Getting the right people to show you the way may be overwhelming at times. Too many people are claiming to be experts in the field. Some even make exaggerated success stories when all they do is just talk about earning money. You know you are with the right teachers when they offer value and nothing else.

The Wealthy Affiliate is one of the best programs I know of that can give you the best value for what you are paying for. They have road tested effective and proven techniques to make your affiliate business succeed. They offer a comprehensive training course with complete and reliable support.

Visit wealthyaffiliate.com today!

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25 Comments

  • Gerald says:

    I believe number 5 is the greatest failure to most affiliate marketers. Giving poor content with no value is like selling a “broken or fake” iPhone. How will the readers buy or even just click your product links if you have no idea or no actual experience on the product that you are selling.

    Thanks Leslie, it seems to me that you will be the next Yaro Starak. ^_^

  • Gerald says:

    I believe number 5 is the greatest failure to most affiliate marketers. Giving poor content with no value is like selling a “broken or fake” iPhone. How will the readers buy or even just click your product links if you have no idea or no actual experience on the product that you are selling.

    Thanks Leslie, it seems to me that you will be the next Yaro Starak. ^_^

  • Blaine Moore says:

    Duplicating content from the host business can be a viable strategy, provided that you do it ethically (w/permission) and you have enough experience to improve upon their own materials. It isn’t a strategy for the newbie, for sure, but if you can split test and sell a product better than the host then you can very quickly get onto their radar for future promotions.

    Blaine Moores last blog post..Have You Ever Run With a Kenyan For Your Birthday?

  • Blaine Moore says:

    Duplicating content from the host business can be a viable strategy, provided that you do it ethically (w/permission) and you have enough experience to improve upon their own materials. It isn’t a strategy for the newbie, for sure, but if you can split test and sell a product better than the host then you can very quickly get onto their radar for future promotions.

    Blaine Moores last blog post..Have You Ever Run With a Kenyan For Your Birthday?

  • Malaika Morris says:

    #4 Spamming….
    I think that’s the one that make all of us (that don’t do it) cringe. I think it makes people opt in to things a lot less than they would because they are afraid of getting spam. I know I don’t enter my email address unless I know for sure it’s something I truly want or need.

    A trick I use…
    Since I have my own hosting account and can create unlimited email addresses. I will create a specific email address for a new site or product I am getting. For instance, if registering my son for soccer I would use [email protected]. That way, if I start getting spam or email from other sources to that address then I know the soccer program sold or shared my email address.

    It’s great to use for a lot of the free ebooks or optins that everyone is doing.

    Malaika Morriss last blog post..Interview With A 2 Year Old

  • Malaika Morris says:

    #4 Spamming….
    I think that’s the one that make all of us (that don’t do it) cringe. I think it makes people opt in to things a lot less than they would because they are afraid of getting spam. I know I don’t enter my email address unless I know for sure it’s something I truly want or need.

    A trick I use…
    Since I have my own hosting account and can create unlimited email addresses. I will create a specific email address for a new site or product I am getting. For instance, if registering my son for soccer I would use [email protected]. That way, if I start getting spam or email from other sources to that address then I know the soccer program sold or shared my email address.

    It’s great to use for a lot of the free ebooks or optins that everyone is doing.

    Malaika Morriss last blog post..Interview With A 2 Year Old

  • Stefanomen says:

    Most of the new comers into affilate marketing thinks that they will make money very fast… and most of the time it’s because they need the money fast!

    But soon after realizing it won’t be automatic they end up trying everything they can in order to spread the word…

    Unfortunatly these methods don’t do any good.

    Learning, training, writing, posting (in the right places)… will after a while work better.

    Stefanomens last blog post..Dix critères importants à considérer pour choisir votre photographe de mariage

  • Stefanomen says:

    Most of the new comers into affilate marketing thinks that they will make money very fast… and most of the time it’s because they need the money fast!

    But soon after realizing it won’t be automatic they end up trying everything they can in order to spread the word…

    Unfortunatly these methods don’t do any good.

    Learning, training, writing, posting (in the right places)… will after a while work better.

    Stefanomens last blog post..Dix critères importants à considérer pour choisir votre photographe de mariage

  • Kemi says:

    #2 is an excellent point. It echoes the saying, ‘If you try to please everyone, you please no one.” One very important word newbies need to reflect on over and over – relevance! If you fail to truly research your niche and learn what people want, you will not be relevant to them. This also echoes point #5. Without relevance, your awesome affiliate product will be of no value!

  • Kemi says:

    #2 is an excellent point. It echoes the saying, ‘If you try to please everyone, you please no one.” One very important word newbies need to reflect on over and over – relevance! If you fail to truly research your niche and learn what people want, you will not be relevant to them. This also echoes point #5. Without relevance, your awesome affiliate product will be of no value!

  • Aaron says:

    These are all great points. There are many reasons that people fail at marketing. The number one reason however that people fail is because they give up. For whatever reason, (they get frustrated, have poor self esteem, Other people tell them they can’t do it), etc….Failure is just a part of success. If you ask any successful person, they will tell you that they had failures. They just didn’t give up and they learned from their failures and kept moving forward.

    Aarons last blog post..“The Importance of a Dream”

  • Aaron says:

    These are all great points. There are many reasons that people fail at marketing. The number one reason however that people fail is because they give up. For whatever reason, (they get frustrated, have poor self esteem, Other people tell them they can’t do it), etc….Failure is just a part of success. If you ask any successful person, they will tell you that they had failures. They just didn’t give up and they learned from their failures and kept moving forward.

    Aarons last blog post..“The Importance of a Dream”

  • Don says:

    Great post, Leslie! However, having been involved in affiliate marketing for over 4 years now, I would add one other key issue that many budding affiliate marketers overlook, yet can ultimately determine their success or failure: Expenses!

    When I first began affiliate marketing, I simply set up an AdWords account, signed up as an affiliate at ClickBank and Commission Junction, and started campaigns. I choose the obvious keywords (diet, lose weight, mortgage, re-finance, etc.) figuring whatever I would pay Google for the clicks would pale in comparison to what I made in commissions…WOW WAS I WRONG! I got tons of clicks, and paid Google tons of cash, but had very little commissions to show for it. So I stopped all my campaigns, read everything I could get my hands on relating to finding little used, off the beaten path, cheap (yet highly effective) keywords and keyword phrases. After about a month of solid research, I re-started my 6 campaigns, and all 6 were profitable. The key, at least for me, has been using common mis-spellings, and very specific phrases instead of just single keywords (and also those same phrases with mis-spellings included for some of the words). I now pay pennies per click, yet generate plenty of clicks, and while my click through rate is similar to what I generated with the obvious keywords, my costs are about 97% lower, therefore I am able to generate a nice profit.

    In my experience, I’ve found that many aspiring affiliate marketers are disillusioned and give up after they realize what they owe Google for all those clicks and no commissions. Many give up either before they realize they what they have done wrong (as they just expected the money to fall in to their lap), or because they realize they actually need to work at this; believe me, it’s hard work trying to find a cheap yet effective phrase or word.

    One other thing people tend to forget about is Yahoo. Everyone is so wrapped up with AdWords and Google, that people tend to forget that Yahoo still has about 40% market share, 2nd only to Google. Yahoo is so under-utilized by the affiliate marketing community, that the keyword prices on Yahoo are dramatically lower than on Google. I’ll just give you one example, recently I found a keyword on Yahoo that was $0.11, vs. $0.26 for the same word on Google – and it put me in the 1st position at Yahoo, while at Google I was at the 4th position. Yahoo affiliate marketing is significantly cheaper than Google affiliate marketing. Also, there is the fact that Yahoo is more affiliate-friendly than Google – Google is always looking for an “excuse” to pull your site off the search results for violating one of their “millions” of rules.

    Thanks for the fantastic article, Leslie. You’re blogs are always very helpful and insightful.

    Take care,.
    Don

  • Don says:

    Great post, Leslie! However, having been involved in affiliate marketing for over 4 years now, I would add one other key issue that many budding affiliate marketers overlook, yet can ultimately determine their success or failure: Expenses!

    When I first began affiliate marketing, I simply set up an AdWords account, signed up as an affiliate at ClickBank and Commission Junction, and started campaigns. I choose the obvious keywords (diet, lose weight, mortgage, re-finance, etc.) figuring whatever I would pay Google for the clicks would pale in comparison to what I made in commissions…WOW WAS I WRONG! I got tons of clicks, and paid Google tons of cash, but had very little commissions to show for it. So I stopped all my campaigns, read everything I could get my hands on relating to finding little used, off the beaten path, cheap (yet highly effective) keywords and keyword phrases. After about a month of solid research, I re-started my 6 campaigns, and all 6 were profitable. The key, at least for me, has been using common mis-spellings, and very specific phrases instead of just single keywords (and also those same phrases with mis-spellings included for some of the words). I now pay pennies per click, yet generate plenty of clicks, and while my click through rate is similar to what I generated with the obvious keywords, my costs are about 97% lower, therefore I am able to generate a nice profit.

    In my experience, I’ve found that many aspiring affiliate marketers are disillusioned and give up after they realize what they owe Google for all those clicks and no commissions. Many give up either before they realize they what they have done wrong (as they just expected the money to fall in to their lap), or because they realize they actually need to work at this; believe me, it’s hard work trying to find a cheap yet effective phrase or word.

    One other thing people tend to forget about is Yahoo. Everyone is so wrapped up with AdWords and Google, that people tend to forget that Yahoo still has about 40% market share, 2nd only to Google. Yahoo is so under-utilized by the affiliate marketing community, that the keyword prices on Yahoo are dramatically lower than on Google. I’ll just give you one example, recently I found a keyword on Yahoo that was $0.11, vs. $0.26 for the same word on Google – and it put me in the 1st position at Yahoo, while at Google I was at the 4th position. Yahoo affiliate marketing is significantly cheaper than Google affiliate marketing. Also, there is the fact that Yahoo is more affiliate-friendly than Google – Google is always looking for an “excuse” to pull your site off the search results for violating one of their “millions” of rules.

    Thanks for the fantastic article, Leslie. You’re blogs are always very helpful and insightful.

    Take care,.
    Don

    • James says:

      Hi don loved your post do you have a website that i can go to. to check out your what your doing. Thanks James.

    • Not sure that he would be there to respond James because that comment was from over a year ago. However, one thing I’ve learned. Traffic generation can not only be inexpensive, it can be free, if you know what you are doing.

      Using the same logic that Don used, you can find keywords that have relatively low competition and increase the search engine rankings of your site for those particular keywords by producing good quality content and generating quality backlinks.

      For example, on my biology site, I’ve done a bunch of keyword research and found some keywords that are REALLY GOOD. So what do I do? I try to find ways to increase my rankings for those keywords one step at a time. It takes effort but, in my opinion, it lasts longer. My rankings don’t go down when I run out of money in my adwords account because my rankings are based on natural processes.

      Hope that makes sense and all the best in your pursuits!

      Leslie

    • James says:

      Thanx a million leslie great advice.

  • Gem Alfred says:

    No proper training is like suicide. how can you become successful in what you do when you are not capable enough. It is best to seek guidance from expert and let them help you.

    • James says:

      Hi don loved your post do you have a website that i can go to. to check out your what your doing. Thanks James.

    • Not sure that he would be there to respond James because that comment was from over a year ago. However, one thing I’ve learned. Traffic generation can not only be inexpensive, it can be free, if you know what you are doing.

      Using the same logic that Don used, you can find keywords that have relatively low competition and increase the search engine rankings of your site for those particular keywords by producing good quality content and generating quality backlinks.

      For example, on my biology site, I’ve done a bunch of keyword research and found some keywords that are REALLY GOOD. So what do I do? I try to find ways to increase my rankings for those keywords one step at a time. It takes effort but, in my opinion, it lasts longer. My rankings don’t go down when I run out of money in my adwords account because my rankings are based on natural processes.

      Hope that makes sense and all the best in your pursuits!

      Leslie

    • James says:

      Thanx a million leslie great advice.

  • Gem Alfred says:

    No proper training is like suicide. how can you become successful in what you do when you are not capable enough. It is best to seek guidance from expert and let them help you.

  • IoWn3rU says:

    I've gotta agree with you, most marketers try to sell something with 2 or 3 lines, haha, good luck!

  • IoWn3rU says:

    I've gotta agree with you, most marketers try to sell something with 2 or 3 lines, haha, good luck!

  • IoWn3rU says:

    I've gotta agree with you, most marketers try to sell something with 2 or 3 lines, haha, good luck!

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